Carpentry 10

The project this year will be a mission style end table. Below you will find the cut list and instructions on how to work our way through the project. Although there are videos and text descriptions of how to complete each step the best way understand the procedures is to be in class on time and be a part of the "live" discussion and demonstration.

Cut List (click on cut list to open google doc that can be printed)

Mr. Dubbs Mission Style End Table
Cut List
Component
Quantity
Length
Width
Thickness
Legs
4
550 mm
45 mm
45 mm
Top Side Aprons
2
380 mm
125 mm
21 mm
Top Back Apron
1
380 mm
125 mm
21 mm
Bottom Rails
4
380 mm
40 mm
21 mm
Front Blades
2
380 mm
30 mm
21 mm
Spindles
6
320 mm
40 mm
15 mm
Top
1
480 mm
480 mm
21 mm
Shelf
1
*
*
21 mm
Drawer Front
1
*
*
19 mm



* indicates the piece is made to fit the project, please measure the project and fill in the measurements once you have measured them from your project.

Lets start with the legs!

1. The first thing we need to do is select the boards we are going to use. We want to grab boards that allow us to the smallest amount of waste possible. After we select our boards we need to layout where we need to rough cut for each of our component pieces. View the following video to see the visual of how to complete this task. Regardless of the length mentioned in the video the rough cut length for the legs is 23" or 585 mm. The rough cut length for everything else (except the top and shelf) will be 16" or 405 mm.



2. Let's start with our legs. The legs are likely the hardest component to build on our table. The first things we need to do after we have our boards rough cut is to joint one face side of the board. Once a face side is jointed you will need to joint the best edge (see how to joint in the tutorials section).

3. At this time we need to mark a line on the end of the board and put a number on each side of the line corresponding to the different leg (ie. 1-1, 2-2, 3-3, 4-4). It is now time to go to the table saw and rip our boards that will be used for our legs into 50 mm wide pieces. Please see the video below for further clarification.




4. Now we can get set up to laminate the leg pieces together! Make sure you have a drop sheet (board), some set paper towel, a brush, glue, mallet and scrap wood. the following video should help with the logistics of how to actually glue the legs up but I need to mention that in the video it appears as though I only put glue on one side of the boards being glued together when in fact the other side was glued before I started the camera for the video.




5. Now that we have our legs laminated we can work on milling the legs to the correct size. We start by jointing two adjacent sides, make sure to mark out the grain on all four sides and indicate which two sides you are going to joint (the video will clarify this). Once you have two adjacent sides it is time to go to the table saw and rip the opposite two sides to 45 mm (these will not have the "fish" marks that you put on after jointing. The last part of milling is to square an end and cut an end (see tips and tutorials for more info). Below is a video that takes you through each step of the milling process.



6. Once the legs are milled to the correct length, width and thickness we can put our carpenters triangle on the top and mark the outsides of the legs. Make sure to indicate the two front faces of the front legs and label all the outside parts of each leg. Now we are ready to mark out the mortise locations. From the bottom of each leg and on the inside edge you need to mark two lines, one at 105 mm the other at 135 mm (both are measured from the bottom of the leg). The top of the legs are marked out in two parts. Between the front legs we need to make four lines. The top line is at 5 mm, the second line is at 25 mm, the third line is at 100mm and the last line is at 120 mm. On one leg we need to make a mark 13 mm in from the outside of a leg and then get set up on the mortiser. Take a look at the video below to clarify the directions. (please use the above measurements and not what is indicated on the video)



Next lets make our Aprons, Rails and Blades.


1. Following the same procedure as the legs we need to rough cut, joint the face sides, joint an edge, rip to width, plane to thickness and then square an end and cut an end.There are video's for all of the procedures listed above in the tips and tutorials section.


2. Now we can "scribe" our shoulder of our tenons. We will need to remove the guard from the table saw in order to complete this specialty cut. (Instructions on how to remove the guard can be found in the tips and tutorials section). The distance between the two kerf marks should end up measuring 345 mm. Set the table saw blade to 5 mm above the table top of the table saw. Now you can set the fence to 13mm and scribe a line using a miter gauge on each end of a rail. Scribe a line on each end of a rail (on the same face) and measure between the kerf marks. Adjust the fence so that the distance between the kerf will equal 345 mm. View the following video for instruction on how to complete this task.





3. Adjust the dado blades so that we can fit the tenons into the mortises with only slight friction with the mortise. The following video will demonstrate how to accomplish this task.





4. Mark out 100 mm from the bottom of each leg on the insides so that we can index the rails to each leg. The aprons will be indexed to the top of each leg and between the front legs we need to measure down 125 mm so we can index the bottom blade. The following video outlines the procedure you need to follow in order to complete this task. (please remember to make sure the to use the measurements from above and not what is mentioned in the video).





5. At the bandsaw we can trim the top/bottom of the tenons to fit the mortise. Take a look at the following video to see how to complete this task.



6. We can make the spindles the same way we made the aprons, rails and blades. The distance between the shoulders should be 285 mm, and when we scribe the tenons the blade height should be 3 mm above the table saw top.


7. Laying out the mortise locations on the aprons and rails is fairly simple. From the should that you scribed you need to measure in 80 mm, 107 mm and 157 mm from each shoulder. Then center the mortise bit in the middle of the aprons/rails and cut a 20 mm deep mortise between the lines you made. The video below helps to demonstrate how to set up the mortiser.



Once all the tenons are fit we can do a dry assembly!



Now it's time to top things off.

1. The overall dimensions of the top are 480 mm x 480 mm. Before we can do anything we need to rough cut some boards that are approx 100 mm wide (we will need 5 of these boards rough cut to ~500 mm). We need to prepare the boards for the top by jointing a face side and both edges. We also need to orientate the boards so the end grain forms a V (I will show you in the video) and try and make sure the grain on the face sides is running the same way. The last thing we need to do before we glue up the panel is to index everything and make sure we have everything needed for the glueing process (you will notice I didn't have a mallet handy in the video). The shelf uses the exact same process but the measurement is taken from the case to ensure a good fit. Take a look at the video to refresh your memory on how to glue up the top and shelf.